Tsadaa (𐤑)

Acceptable ways to write it: tsada, tsda, tsadaa

The letter tsada (𐤑) is the eighteenth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter Ts in the English language. Nonetheless, it’s a combination of two letters in order to create the sound that was produced by the original Paleo-Hebrew letter. 

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew tsada
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤐
Ts ts
צ ץ
ص
ܨ
Ϻ Ͷ
Ͳ Ϡ
Ϸ
𐌑
Ц ц
Ч ч
Ћ ћ
Џ џ
Transliteration
tsada
ts
tsade
sad
sade
sade
san
sampi
sho
san
tse
che
tshe
dzhe
Pronunciation
Ṣädäy
ts
Ṣādi
Ṣād
Ṣāḏē
Ṣāḏē
/tsʼ/

san
zz
tch
/tʃ/
j
Number
90
N/A
90
90
90
90

900
90
900
90
Definition
Man on his side, snare, correct trail, need, desire, hunt, wait, fish hook
?
Homogeneity, consistent, full (i.e. a solid block)

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of a fish hook and can refer to catching something. The original picture can symbolize something inescapable, or pulling toward, or a harvest being taken. The pictograph is a picture of a trail leading to a destination such as a watering hole or another trail. The letter is also connected to tsad (𐤑𐤃) meaning side, against, or concerning.

History of the letter Ts

The origin of ts is unclear. It may have come from a Proto-Sinaitic script based on a pictogram of a plant, perhaps a papyrus plant, or a fishhook (in Modern Hebrew, צד tsad means “[he] hunt[ed]”, and in Arabic صاد ṣād means “[he] hunted”).

Proto-Sinaitic (also referred to as Sinaitic, Proto-Canaanite when found in Canaan, the North Semitic alphabet, or Early Alphabetic) is considered the earliest trace of alphabetic writing and the common ancestor of both the Ancient South Arabian script and the Phoenician alphabet, which led to many modern alphabets including the Greek alphabet. According to common theory, Canaanites who spoke a Semitic language (hypothetically reconstructed as Proto-Semitic) repurposed Egyptian hieroglyphs to construct a different script. The script is attested in a small corpus of inscriptions found at Serabit el-Khadim in the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt dating to the Middle Bronze Age [2100 (1825)–1500 BCE (2425 AM)]. The earliest proto-Sinaitic inscriptions are mostly dated to between about 1950 BCE (1975 AM) [early date] and about 1550 BCE (2375 AM) [late date].