Qauap (𐤒)

Acceptable ways to write it: quph, qauaph, qauap, qup, quph

The letter quph (𐤒) is the nineteenth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter Q and is used to replace most hard letter K placements in the English language. Nonetheless, the letter Q is the more accurate letter but was more than likely pronounced similarly to the modern letter K in the English language.

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew quph
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤒
Q q
ק
ق
ܩ
Ϙ ϙ
Φ φ
Q q
Ҁ ҁ
Ф ф
Transliteration
quph
q
qop
qaf
qop
qop
koppa or qoppa
phi
q
koppa
ef or fe
Pronunciation
qōp
q
qof
qāf
qop
qōp̄
/k/
/faɪ/
/ˈkjuː/

f
Number
100
N/A
100
100
100
100
90
500
90
90
500
Definition
Divide, sun on horizon, behind, gather, condense, Go around, circle.
?
Conscience, existence, stand

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of the sun at the horizon where the light is concentrated at this point, while the rest of the sky is dark. This is a “coming” together of the light. Ancient Semitic letters that were originally oriented in a horizontal plane were tilted to a vertical plane. The various meanings of this letter are “sun,” “revolution,” “circle” and “horizon.” This letter can also mean condense as the light gathers at the sun when it is at the horizon.

History of the letter Q

The visual appearance of the letter Q was introduced in 1000 BCE (2925 AM). “Q” was then a circle with a vertical line through it. A “Q” that we would recognize appeared in Roman inscriptions in 520 BCE (3405 AM) — it was also then that the “u after q” rule was invented.

In the form found on the Moabite stone, the vertical stroke extended to the top of the loop, and the same is the case with an early form from the island of Thera. The Etruscan form was identical to the Greek. The Latin alphabet had two forms, the latter of which resembled the modern Q. In the minuscule form the stroke was moved to the right side of the letter because of the speed of writing. This produced a cursive form similar to the modern q in the 6th century CE.

In Greek the letter was largely redundant, and in the eastern alphabet it was entirely superseded by kappa (Κ). In the Chalcidian alphabet, however, it lingered and spread from there, probably through the Etruscan, into the Latin alphabet, where it was used only with a following u, the combination representing the unvoiced labiovelar sound in such words as quaestor. The combination of these two letters holds to the present day, and in modern English q is not used unless followed by u, even if, in words such as oblique, the sound is a simple velar and not a labiovelar.