Kap (𐤊)

Acceptable ways to write it: kap, kaph, kph, kp

The letter kaph (𐤊) is the eleventh letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter K, and the letter C in the English language. However, the usage of the letter C for it is a very rare and inaccurate usage when translating words from Paleo-Hebrew to English. The letter C is more accurately connected to gymal (𐤂).

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew kaph
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤊
K k
כך
ك
𐡊
ܟܟ
Κ κ
K k
К к
Transliteration
kaph
K
kaph
kaf
kap
kap
kappa
K
Ka
Pronunciation
kāf
k
kāf
kāf
kāp
kāp
káppa
ˈkeɪ
k
Number
20
N/A
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
Definition
Palm of the hand, to open, tame, subdue, bend, curve
palm of hand
Similarity, Other like me, Likeness

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of the open palm of the hand. The palm facing up and bent forms a “cupped” shape. When holding up the open hand with palm open it appears to represent “wings” symbolizing to open, or to cover, or to allow something. This letter is pronounced as a “k,” as in the word kaph, when used as a stop or as a “kh” (pronounced hard like the “ch” in the German name Bach).

History of the letter K

The visual appearance of the letter K was introduced in 2000 BCE (1925 AM). Around 800 BC, the Greeks reversed it and took it on as their own “kappa.” Early Greek forms from the island of Thera have some resemblance to the Semitic. The Chalcidic, Etruscan, and Latin forms were identical, and the letter has retained its shape until modern times.

The sound represented by the letter throughout its known history until the present day has been the unvoiced velar stop. Its function in the Latin alphabet was usurped by the letter C, which, taken over as representing the voiced velar, came under Etruscan influence to represent the unvoiced sound as well. Later the letter G was adapted from C to represent the voiced velar and C stood for the unvoiced only. The letter K fell into disuse except in official formulas or initials such as in the word Kalendae.