Gayamal (𐤂)

Acceptable ways to write it: gymal, gayamal, gyml

The letter gymal (𐤂) is the third letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter G and the letter C in the English language. However, the letter C in its earliest form had a similar sound to the letter G but had the shape of a boomerang or similar shape to the <. Nonetheless, the letter G is more common in both Paleo-Hebrew and Modern Hebrew when you read over the writings.

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew gymal
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤂
C c
G g
ג
ج
ܓ
Γ γ
C c
G g
J j
Ɣ
Г Ґ
Transliteration
gymal
c
g
gimel
gim
gamal
gamal
gamma
C
G
J
Ge
Pronunciation
gi-meyl
c
g
gi-meyl
ǧīm
Gāmal
Gāmal
ˈɡæmə
c
g
j
ge
Number
3
N/A
3
3
3
3
3
3, 7, and 10
3
Definition
Foot, walk, gather, carry, camel, cause movement, staff, throwing stick
Foot, walk, staff
Assembly, Join

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of gymal is of the foot of a man. The Ābarayam were always on their feet traveling, working as well as playing. The old Latin word for a leg is “gam”. The word gam means to gather as a group of animals gathers at the water hole to drink. The picture for gymal would evolve into a Camel (Gamel) shape.

History of the letter C

The letter C was introduced in 1500 CE (2425 AM). The first “C” shape emerged in Phoenician and stood for a foot, hunter’s stick. It began to have more of a boomerang shape. The Greeks renamed it “gamma” and when they switched to reading from right to left to left to right in 500 BC, they flipped the shape. As the letter spread to Italy, it took on a more crescent shape, and the C as we know it today was born. 

The sound represented by the letter in Semitic and in Greek was the voiced velar stop, represented in English by the “hard” g. In the Latin alphabet it came to represent the unvoiced velar stop (indicated in English by k as well as c) and was for some time, it appears, used for both the voiced and unvoiced sounds. Finally, a new symbol G was used for the voiced sound, and C displaced K as the representative of the unvoiced stop. Before k the letter is often redundant (e.g., in “thick,” “clock,” etc.).

History of the letter G

The letter G was introduced in 250 BCE (3675 AM). The history of this letter began with the Latin alphabet. In the Greek alphabet, it represented the voiced velar stop by its third letter gamma (Γ). To avoid confusion a new letter G was differentiated from C and used to represent the voiced velar, while C henceforward stood for the unvoiced velar only. The new letter was placed in the alphabet in the place of Greek zeta (Ζ) which was not required in the Latin alphabet.