Shayan (𐤔)

Acceptable ways to write it: shyn, shayan, shayn

The letter shyn (𐤔) is the twenty-first letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter Sh and the letter S in the English language. Nonetheless, the letter Sh is the more accurate letter but can be easily confused with the letter S given the different ways the English letter is pronounced in modern words.

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew shyn
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤔
Sh sh
ש
ش
ܫ
Σ σ
ϛ
S s
ß
Ʃ ʃ
Š š
С с
Ш ш
Щ щ
ሠ ሸ
Transliteration
shyn
sh
shin
shin
shin
shin
sigma
stigma
S
Eszett
Esh
Sh
antisigma
Es
Sha
Shta
Pronunciation
sheen
sh
shin
shin
shin
shin
/ˈsɪɡmə/
/ˈɛs/
[ɛsˈtsɛt]
sh
/ʂ/
s
/ʃ/
sh
Number
300
N/A
300
300
300
300
200
6
200

Definition
Teeth, eat, consume, destroy, bite, two, change, divide, press, repeat
Teeth
Radiance, diffusion, spread

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of a tooth, destruction, and sometimes fire or something that destroys. The original picture for this letter is a picture of the two front teeth. This letter has the meanings of “teeth,” “sharp” and “press”. It also has the meaning of “two,” “again” and “both.”

History of the letter Sh

Cyrillic ш

Sha (Ш) is a letter of the Glagolitic and Cyrillic scripts. It commonly represents the voiceless postalveolar fricative /ʃ/. In English, Sha is romanized as sh or as š, the latter being the equivalent letter in the Latin alphabets of Czech, Slovak, Slovene, Serbian, Macedonian, Croatian, Latvian, and Lithuanian. Sha has its earliest origins in Phoenician Shin and is linked closely to Shin’s Greek equivalent: Sigma (Σ, σ, ς).

Grapheme Š

The grapheme Š, š (S with caron) is used in various contexts representing the sh sound usually denoting the voiceless postalveolar fricative or similar voiceless retroflex fricative /ʂ/. The symbol originates with the 15th-century Czech alphabet as introduced by the reforms of Jan Hus. From there, it was first adopted into the Croatian alphabet by Ljudevit Gaj in 1830 to represent the same sound, and from there on into other orthographiesSome orthographies such as Bulgarian Cyrillic, Macedonian Cyrillic, and Serbian Cyrillic use the “ш” letter which represents the sound “š” would represent in Latin alphabets. 

The symbol is also used as the romanization of Cyrillic ш in ISO 9 and scientific transliteration and deployed in the Latin based writing systems of Macedonian, Bulgarian, Serbian, Belarusian, Ukrainian, and Bashkir. In addition, the grapheme transliterates cuneiform orthography of Sumerian and Akkadian /ʃ/ or /t͡ʃ/, and (based on Akkadian orthography) the Hittite /s/ phoneme, as well as the /ʃ/ phoneme of Semitic languages, transliterating shin (Phoenician 𐤔 and its descendants), the direct predecessor of Cyrillic ш.