Rash (𐤓)

Acceptable ways to write it: rash, rsh

The letter rash (𐤓) is the twentieth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter R in the English language. The letter has maintained its meaning throughout all of the changes to the language and remains consistent between Paleo-Hebrew and Modern Hebrew for its English meaning.

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew rash
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤓
R r
ר
ر
ܪ
Ρ ρ
R r
Р р
Transliteration
rush
r
resh
ra
resh
resh
rho
r
er
Pronunciation
rūsh
r
rēsh
rāʾ
rēsh
rēsh
/ˈroʊ/
/ˈɑːr/
r
Number
200
N/A
200
200
200
200
100
100
100
Definition
Head and person, man, beginning, top, rule, inheritance, possession
Head
Order, command

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of the head of a man who is raised up to look, and it is also an ancient Abaray meaning of “head.” The word picture for the rash is a person, the profile of the head) the highest or top, and most important. In our modern times, it is the equivalent of someone taking a headshot for their identification card or the internet.

History of the letter R

The visual appearance of the letter R was introduced in 500 BCE (3425 AM). “R” first appears in ancient Semitic in the form of a profile of a human. Pronounced “resh” it translated to (no surprise) “head.” The Romans flipped it to face right and added a tail, “probably to distinguish it from ‘P’,” writes Rosen.

The original Semitic letter may have been inspired by an Egyptian hieroglyph for tp, “head”. It was used for /r/ by Semites because, in their language, the word for “head” was rêš (also the name of the letter). It developed into Greek ‘Ρ’ ῥῶ (rhô) and Latin R. The descending diagonal stroke develops as a graphic variant in some Western Greek alphabets (writing rho as Greek Rho 03.svg), but it was not adopted in most Old Italic alphabets; most Old Italic alphabets show variants of their rho between a “P” and a “D” shape but without the Western Greek descending stroke.

The descending stroke of the Latin letter R was fully developed by the 3rd century BC, as seen in the Tomb of the Scipios sarcophagus inscriptions of that era. From around 50 AD, the letter P would be written with its loop fully closed, assuming the shape formerly taken by R.