Nauan (𐤍)

Acceptable ways to write it: nauan, nun

The letter nun (𐤍) is the fourteenth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter N in the English language. The letter is widely accepted as only having one English equivalent in pronunciation and function. 

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew nun
Letter
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
𐤍
English
N n
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
נ ן
Arabic
ن
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
ܢܢ
Greek
Ν ν
Latin
N n
Cyrillic
Н н
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Transliteration
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
nun
English
N
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
nun
Arabic
nun
Aramaic
nun
Syriac (Aramaic)
nun
Greek
nu
Latin
N
Cyrillic
En
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Pronunciation
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
noon
English
n
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
nun
Arabic
noon
Aramaic
noon
Syriac (Aramaic)
noon
Greek
nju
Latin
ɛn
Cyrillic
n
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Number
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
50
English
N/A
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
50
Arabic
50
Aramaic
50
Syriac (Aramaic)
50
Greek
50
Latin
50
Cyrillic
50
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Definition
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
offspring, seed, sperm, fish, heir, kingdom, continue, perpetuate
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
fish
Arabic
us, generic, unite
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of a seed with the root coming out of it. The seed is the beginning of new life. However, the image also resembles the depiction of a man’s sperm, which also represents new life when it fertilizes the egg or ovum of a woman. The Ābarayam word for son is (𐤁𐤍). The first letter is bayt (𐤁) with a word picture of a house. The second letter is a nun (𐤍) with a word picture of life. These two letters together are a word picture of “life in the house.” Thus, the son continues the life of the family; through the son, generations will come.

History of the letter N

The visual appearance of the letter N was introduced in 1800 BCE (2125 AM). Around the same time as “M,” “N” was emerging in Matsarayam (𐤌𐤑𐤓𐤉𐤌) with a small ripple on top and a larger one below. The word translated to “snake” or “cobra.” Ancient Shamayam (𐤔𐤌𐤉𐤌) gave it the sound “n,” meaning fish. By around 1000 BC, the sign contained just one wave and was named “nu” by the Greeks.

The form evolved from early inscriptions from Thera and Corinth to a three-stroke character in the Ionic alphabet of Abu Simbel. The four-stroke Etruscan character resembled the Latin M, while the Latin form was largely indistinguishable from the modern N. The Carolingian hand developed the rounded minuscule form, and from this derives the modern minuscule n.

The sound that the letter has represented throughout its history is the dental nasal, the nasals being of all sounds the least liable to change. Before the velar consonants k, hard c, hard g, q, and x, however, n has the velar sound heard in long as distinguished from the dental sound heard in lawn.

⟨n⟩ represents a dental or alveolar nasal in virtually all languages that use the Latin alphabet, and in the International Phonetic Alphabet. A common digraph with ⟨n⟩ is ⟨ng⟩, which represents a velar nasal in a variety of languages, usually positioned word-finally in English. Often, before a velar plosive (as in ink or jungle), ⟨n⟩ alone represents a velar nasal. In Italian and French, ⟨gn⟩ represents a palatal nasal /ɲ/. The Portuguese and Vietnamese spelling for this sound is ⟨nh⟩, while Spanish, Breton, and a few other languages use the letter ⟨ñ⟩.

In English, ⟨n⟩ is generally silent when it is preceded by an ⟨m⟩ at the end of words, as in hymn; however, it is pronounced in this combination when occurring word medially, as in hymnal. On the other hand, other consonants are often silent when they precede an ⟨n⟩ at the beginning of an English word. Examples include gnome, knife, mnemonic, and pneumonia.