Mam (𐤌)

Acceptable ways to write it: mam, mm

The letter mam (𐤌) is the thirteenth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter M in the English language. The letter is widely accepted as only having one English equivalent in pronunciation and function. 

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew mam
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤌
M m
מ ם
م
ܡܡ
Μ μ
M m
Ӎ ӎ
Transliteration
mam
M
mem
mim
mem
mim
mu
M
Em
Pronunciation
mēm
m
mēm
mīm
mem
mēm
mju
ɛm
m
Number
40
N/A
40
40
40
40
40
40
40
Definition
Water, Chaos, mighty, liquid, massive, sea, blemish
water
place, thing, being

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of waves and symbolizes something massive, like the ocean, something in chaos, or indicating: to come from, as water in motion. When it is the first letter of a word it can be a prefix and has more than one meaning, i.e., the preposition “from or than” or can indicate the participle form of certain verbs. However, when it is the last letter of a word, following the yud (𐤉) it creates a plural of the object it is attached to. For example, Ābar (𐤏𐤁𐤓) is an individual who would become the progenitor of many nations. However, an Ābaray (𐤏𐤁𐤓𐤉) is one individual who is from the tribe of Ābar. Lastly, an Ābarayam (𐤏𐤁𐤓𐤉𐤌) is multiple people from the tribe of Ābar.

History of the letter M

The visual appearance of the letter M was introduced in 1800 BCE (2125 AM). By 800 BC, the peaks became zigzags and the structure was made horizontal — our “M” in sound and appearance. Curious forms occur in the various Italic alphabets, including Umbrian, Oscan, and Faliscan. The rounded form appears in the uncial writing of the 5th or 6th century. The cursive hands of the 6th century show a different rounded form that is based on the Carolingian.

The sound represented by the letter has been from the beginning the labial nasal. Of all sounds, the nasals are least liable to change, a fact that is reflected in the consistent history of the letter.