Lamad (𐤋)

Acceptable ways to write it: lamad, lmd

The letter lamad (𐤋) is the twelfth letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter L in the English language. The letter is widely accepted as only having one English equivalent in pronunciation and function. 

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew lamad
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤋
L l
ל
ل
ܠ
Λ λ
L l
Л л
ለ ላ
Transliteration
lamad
L
lamed
lam
lamadh
lamad
lambda
L
El
Pronunciation
lāmaḏ
l
lāmed
lām
lāmadh
lāmaḏ
lám(b)da
ˈɛl
l
Number
30
N/A
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
Definition
Staff, Goad, Control, Toward, Protect, Authority, bind, yoke, lead
goad
Service, For, Provide

History of the Meaning

The pictograph of the word is of a cattle goad, a staff, or a rod. When the letter is the first letter of a word it can be a prefix, indicating several different meanings: the infinitive “to,” or toward or belonging to. The letter can also have a word picture of “control, or urging forward.” The Ābarayam raised sheep for wool, food, leather, and milk. The Ābaray shepherd always carried a staff, which could be used as a weapon to protect the flock from predators as well as to discipline the sheep. The staff also had a bent end that could be used to pull a lamb.

History of the letter L

The visual appearance of the letter L was introduced in 1800 BCE (2125 AM). The Greeks flipped the letter and renamed it “lamda.” The Romans straightened the bottom leg into a right angle. The modern form L derives from Latin. In the uncial writing of the 7th century or earlier, the vertical stroke was raised above the line. In Latin cursive of the 6th century, l appears as a rounded form, and this is the parent of the Carolingian form, from which derives the current rounded minuscule or the straight form.

The sound consistently represented by the letter throughout its history has been the liquid or “lateral” for which it at present stands. In some languages, such as in certain Slavonic languages, the contrast between a back l and a front l is distinctive. This is not the case in English, but in general, the English l is pronounced farther back than the l in German and certain other continental language