Bayat (𐤁)

Acceptable ways to write it: bayt, bayat, byt, bayath, byth

The letter bayt (𐤁) is the second letter in the Afroasiatic language known as Paleo-Hebrew. The letter has been equated with the letter B and the letter V in the English language. However, the letter V is mostly associated with Modern Hebrew because of the sound, whereas it originally came from a branch of the Paleo-Hebrew letter we associate with U in the English language.

The Paleo-Hebrew language or Original Ābarayam language is one spoken with an emphasis on the rauach (breath, wind, spirit). With the language of the Ābarayam, each letter has a meaning and a number associated with it that adds meaning to each word they’re used with. Below you will be able to learn more about the letter in Ancient Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek, and much more. However, you can read more about the Paleo-Hebrew alaph-bayt on Wikipedia.

paleo-hebrew bayt
Ābarayt
Paleo-Hebrew
Ancient Hebrew
English
Masoretic Hebrew
Askenazi Hebrew
Israeli Hebrew
Modern Hebrew
Arabic
Aramaic
Syriac (Aramaic)
Greek
Latin
Cyrillic
South Arabian
Ge'ez
Letter
𐤁
B b
V v
ב
ب
ܒ
Β β
B b
V v
В Б
Transliteration
bayt
b
v
bet
ba
beth
bet
beta
B
V
Ve
Pronunciation
ba-ate
b
v
be-ate
bāʾ
Bēth
Bēṯ
bē̂-ta
b
v
ve
Number
2
N/A
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
Definition
House, Tent, inside, family
House
Medium, Bring

History of the Meaning

The pictograph for bayt is the floorplan of a tent. The Ābarayam lived in goat-hair tents, which were divided into two halves, male and female sections, and divided by a wall. The picture of the letter is a representation of the floorplan of the tent. The tent was the place where the family laid their “bed”.

History of the letter B

The letter B was introduced in 1979 BCE (1946 AM). On its side, the letter B makes the image of a home, complete with a roof, door, and windows. In Egypt, the letter B sounded like the “h” in modern-day English and meant “shelter.” From earliest times, the letter retained second place in all the European alphabets except the Cyrillic. The earliest form of the letter appears on the Moabite Stone, dating from the 9th century BCE. Early Greek forms gave way to intermediate Greek and Latin renditions that were virtually identical to the modern B. From the 2nd century CE the sound in Latin shows evidence of confusion in spelling between b and v.

History of the letter V

The letter V was introduced in 1386 CE (5311 AM). The Romans (Latin) did not differentiate between “V” and “U” sounds. Even Shakespeare used “U’s” in place of “V’s” in his plays and poems. Capital “V’s” at the start of words started to appear in the 1400s. It was not required in Latin to represent the bilabial semivowel (w), for the Latins had taken the letter V to represent both this sound and the corresponding vowel (u).

During the Late Middle Ages, two minuscule glyphs developed which were both used for sounds including /u/ and modern /v/. The pointed form “v” was written at the beginning of a word, while a rounded form “u” was used in the middle or end, regardless of sound. So whereas “valour” and “excuse” appeared as in modern printing, “have” and “upon” were printed as “haue” and “vpon”.